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 Your Guide to Medical Imaging Equipment

Enjoy these tips, tricks and insights that answer 100's of questions we've received from radiology and imaging professionals that need help buying, selling, servicing and maintaining their medical imaging equipment: MRI, CT, C-Arm, Digital X-ray, PET/CT and Women's Health. We extend the life of imaging equipment so that healthcare providers worldwide can extend the lives of patients. This is why we answer your imaging equipment questions.

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How to Choose the Best Fluoroscopy Equipment for Your Surgery Center

Posted by David McAndrews

Jun 25, 2012 11:21:00 AM

:: 1 minute read ::

Outpatient surgery centers have been cropping up all over the United States. Like clutches of fledgling eagles, still puffy with the fading remnants of their downy coats, these doctor groups are spreading their entrepreneurial wings in maiden flight, hoping to grasp quality treatment and fiscal growth simultaneously in their dagger-like talons!

That’s all very ennobling and inspirational and stuff, but before outpatient surgery doctors can take that plunge out of the hospital they’ve been nesting in so far, they need to settle on which equipment they intend to use. Luckily, Block Imaging refurbishes and sells medical imaging equipment that can match just about every set of surgical needs.

We can essentially break this equipment down into four levels:

 

Levels I and II: C-Arms

Many outpatient facilities are using C-Arms on surgical procedures, and to great effect. Depending on the complexity of the procedures, some sites may need the vascular capabilities of a higher-end C-Arm.

 

Level I-

Basic C-Arm with a basic C-Arm table (example: OEC 9600 with an STI Streamline 1 table)

Perfect for pain docs who need to see where they are placing the needles.

 

OEC 9600 C-Arm  Streamline 1 Table

 

Level II-

Vascular C-Arm with a vascular C-Arm table (example: OEC 9800 Vascular with a Vmaxx)

On the base camp of truly interventional surgery is the vascular C-Arm. They allow doctors to “roadmap” and view digitally subtracted images.

 

OEC 9800 C-Arm V Maxx C-Arm Table 

 

Levels III and IV- Cath Labs

The jump between C-Arm and Cath Lab is large because of the expense involved in room renovation (not needed with C-arms) which is expensive and complex. Provided your room is large enough to hold a Cath Lab, other room renovation components include: 3phase 480 power, toughing, HVAC, lead lining, and unistrut.

 

Level III-

Analog Cath Lab (example: GE LCA+)

 

GE LCA+ Cath Lab

 

Once a surgery center decides to bridge the construction gap they then have to decide if the next major step is worth it to them or not. Opting to purchase a digital Cath Lab doubles or even triples equipment price and is often unnecessary in the outpatient world, but there are scenarios where digital capabilities could be applicable.

 

Level IV-

Digital Cath Lab (example: GE Innova series or Philips FD series)

 

GE Innova 2100 Cath Lab

 

There are many variables to consider before a new outpatient surgery center can get airborne. Specialties, budgets, and space constraints all figure into imaging equipment purchasing decisions, so feel free to seek a little guidance from our sales and project management teams. We want to make certain your new center has its equipment needs met in the best way possible so your first flight out of the hospital will be a successful one.

Download the C-arm Buyer's Guide

Written by David McAndrews

author of blog post

Topics: Buying Imaging Equipment, Imaging Equipment Solutions, Cath/Angio, C-Arm

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