Your Guide to Medical Imaging Equipment

Enjoy these tips, tricks and insights that answer 100's of questions we've received from radiology and imaging professionals that need help buying, selling, servicing and maintaining their medical imaging equipment: MRI, CT, C-Arm, Digital X-ray, PET/CT and Women's Health. We extend the life of imaging equipment so that health care providers worldwide can extend the lives of patients. This is why we answer your imaging equipment questions.

~ Block Imaging Team

Cath Lab Equipment Planning... Takes Longer Than You Think

Posted by Chris Sharrock

Find me on:

Oct 28, 2011 9:13:00 AM

cath lab equipment planning“It doesn’t take that long to install Cath Lab equipment, right?” My answer to this question would be that it probably takes longer than you think. Of all the modalities that Block Imaging works with, Interventional Lab installations are the most involved.

Between the construction process, the hardware, mechanics, and software/networking... the entire process of bringing a Cath Lab into a facility can take anywhere from 45 days to as long as six months start to finish!

As you begin your Interventional Lab planning process, here are some very important things to consider...

Know the Regulations in Your State

Some states are easier to install in than others. For example, if you are installing a lab in California you have to consider things like OSHPOD and the new seismic equipment regulations that went into effect in 2010. Many states require a Certificate of Need for a purchase this size. Some states such as Florida have their own set of regulations regarding interventional cardiology that could set you back in your timeline.

Early Site Planning Saves Time in the End

Before you start turning wrenches or pounding nails, you want to make sure that you have spoken with the engineers that will be installing your equipment. They will be able to give you site-specific drawings that you can then pass on to your architect or contractor. The more due diligence you do up front, the more time and money you will save on the back end.

Construction

Timelines on construction can range all over the board, but a good rule of thumb is that they will always take longer than you anticipate. The best way to avoid delays is to make sure the installing engineers and contractors are communicating on a regular basis. In fact, we strongly recommend the engineers make at least two site visits prior to coming to install the equipment. You can save yourself a lot of time and a lot of money by doing this. It gets very expensive and very stressful when you have an engineering team on site not able to work because of construction issues.

Installation

Assuming you have no construction delays and everything is correct when the engineer arrives with the equipment to install it at your facility, a normal installation should take around two weeks. This is of course an estimate and the process could always take longer as there are many variables to consider. Modern Interventional Suites require a great deal of networking and interaction with your IT department. We have seen networking issues cause many delays in the past. Make sure your IT department is ready and has the appropriate information to give the engineers when they arrive.

Need more assistance with your Interventional lab project? Give us a call!

..................

chris sharrock rel author

Written by Chris Sharrock

Chris Sharrock is the Fluoroscopy Product Manager at Block Imaging. Sometimes referred to as the “The C-Arm Guy”, Chris has a passion for music, fitness and genuinely enjoys helping others make decisions about c-arms and fluoroscopy equipment. You can download Chris’ very popular “C-Arm Buyer’s Guide” or connect with him here.  

 
 


 medical facility construction tips     ge innova interventional labs

Choosing the Best Contractor for Your Medical Facility Construction

 

GE Innova 2100 vs 3100 vs 4100 Interventional Radiology Equipment

Topics: Imaging Equipment Solutions, Cath/Angio, Imaging Equipment Project Management

    

Subscribe to Receive Medical Imaging Articles by Email

Questions? Ideas? Imaging project you'd like to discuss? Let us know!